Sporting KT Tape at the World's Largest Relay

Congratulations to the “after-NUUN delight” relay team that recently finished the Hood to Coast Relay Race! Their team was comprised of 12 bloggers who met in person for the very first time at the race.  See below for an excerpt from team member Kelly’s blog about the event.  The whole team wore a rainbow of different colors in their  team sparkle skirts and you can bet that they were sporting KT Tape to get them through the 200 miles of Hood to Coast in just 28 hours! For more on tips for running distance relays from the KT Tape Blog, click here.   From According to Kelly: the 200 mile hood to coast course consists of 36 legs, 12 team members & 2 vans (6 runners in each van). each team member runs three legs, in rotation. for example… runner 1 runs his leg & then hands off the “baton” to runner 2, who is anxiously waiting for him (or her) at the first exchange. runner 2 takes off, while runner 1 rejoins his teammates in the van. the van then leapfrogs down the road to the next checkpoint, to drop off runner 3 – & so on, & so on… with each runner running every 12 legs. make sense? the legs vary in length from around 3 miles to a little over 8 miles; and the terrain ranges from virtually flat to steep (steep) hills. runners end up running anywhere from 13-ish miles to just about 20 miles. & if that’s not enough pressure, hood to coast teams must complete the course within a 31-hour time limit (averaging approximately 9:30, or less, per mile). teams start on friday between 3:30 a.m. & 6:45 p.m. in staggered waves of approximately 20 teams every 15 minutes, with the hope that all teams will finish the race by 9 p.m. on saturday. the hood to coast starting line is at timberline Lodge, just below mt. hood at an elevation of 6,000-feet, & proceeds down timberline road. this wicked crazy, first leg drops 2,000 feet in elevation over about 6 miles, & the following two legs have a combined elevation drop of 2,300 feet in about 10 miles. the remainder of the route passes through hilly rural and sometimes unpaved backroads on the way to the finish line on the oregon coast in seaside. with over 20,000 runners, 4,100 volunteers, 580 honey buckets (porta potties) on course & participants from all 50 states & 35 countries – hood to coast literally is the largest relay in the world… Congratulations on completing the largest relay in the world, ladies!  For a complete race report by Team “after-NUUN delight”, visit their blog here.